Signs of Diabetes

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 June 2015 05:32 Written by admin Thursday, 25 June 2015 05:32

There are 18.3 million people in the United States, or 6.4% of the population, who have diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that means your body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood effectively.

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. There are 20.8 million children and adults in the United States, or 7% of the population, who have diabetes. While an estimated 14.6 million have been diagnosed with diabetes, unfortunately, 6.2 million people are unaware that they have the disease. Diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications (hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperosmolar coma) may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease (doubled risk), chronic renal failure (diabetic nephropathy is the main cause of dialysis in developed world adults), retinal damage , nerve damage (of several kinds), and microvascular damage, which may cause erectile dysfunction (impotence) and poor healing. About 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes. As with type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes occurs more often in some ethnic groups and among women with a family history of diabetes.

Diabetes affects more than 20 million Americans. About 54 million Americans have prediabetes. Diabetes, without qualification, usually refers to diabetes mellitus, but there are several rarer conditions also named diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. An autoimmune disease results when the body’s system for fighting infection turns against a part of the body. In diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes. About 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2. This form of diabetes is most often associated with older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, physical inactivity, and certain ethnicities. About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. About 65 percent of deaths among those with diabetes are attributed to heart disease and stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes can complicate pregnancy, and birth defects are more common in babies born to women with diabetes.

In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to develop rapidly, over a couple of weeks, and are more severe. In type 2 diabetes, symptoms develop slowly and are usually milder. At least 65 percent of those with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Diabetes treatment depends on the type and severity of the diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, exercise, and a diabetic diet. Type 2 diabetes is first treated with weight reduction, a diabetic diet, and exercise. Regular exercise is especially important for people with diabetes. It helps with blood sugar control, weight loss, and high blood pressure. People with diabetes who exercise are less likely to experience a heart attack or stroke than diabetics who do not exercise regularly. Metformin this is often the first medicine that is advised for type 2 diabetes. Sulphonylureas for example, glibelclamide, gliclazide, glimerpirizide, glipizide, gliquidone, increase the amount of insulin produced by your pancreas.

Juliet Cohen writes articles for health and fitness and diseases treatment . For more information visit our site at http://www.healthfitnesstips.org/.

Treatment for diabetes varies on a number of factors, including weight, age and any complications you may encounter.

Learn how to protect yourself from the deadly disease(Diabetes).

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

{According to the Health Care Association,Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes, accounting for at least two out of three diabetes-related deaths. While the statistics are scary, here are some important steps you can take to help prevent this deadly disease.|This kit contains material useful during and after your
diabetes — Tips, Suggestions, and other information
will help you at the time of your diabetes .

i) A Step-By-Step Guide : In this kit you will easily know.
many tricks, along with :

* History of Diabetes
* Diabetes Glossary
* What is Pre-Diabetes and Who is at Risk?
* The Cause of Diabetes
* The Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes
* The Treatment of Diabetes
* Diabetes and Your Emotions
* Possible Diabetes Complications
* How Diabetes is Managed?
* Diabetes Facts
* Diabetes Food and Meal Planning
* Diabetes Nutrition
* Insulin Resistance
* Insulin Pumps
* Lantus Insulin
* Diabetes Cure
* Diabetes Education
* and much much more . . . . . . . . . . . .}

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

Other FAQ’s

Learn More

Diabetes Prevention and Management

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 June 2015 07:05 Written by admin Thursday, 25 June 2015 07:05

There are 18.3 million people in the United States, or 6.4% of the population, who have diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that means your body cannot control the level of sugar in the blood effectively.

Diabetes is a hormone disorder that can cause problems with the kidneys, legs and feet, eyes, heart, nerves, and blood flow.Diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications (hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis or nonketotic hyperosmolar coma) may occur if the disease is not adequately controlled. Diabetes is on the increase, probably because people are living longer, getting fatter and leading increasingly inactive lifestyles. Diabetes, without qualification, usually refers to diabetes mellitus, but there are several rarer conditions also named diabetes. The most common of these is diabetes insipidus in which the urine is not sweet; it can be caused by either kidney or pituitary gland damage. The term “type 1 diabetes” has universally replaced several former terms, including childhood-onset diabetes, juvenile diabetes, and insulin-dependent diabetes. “Type 2 diabetes” has also replaced several older terms, including adult-onset diabetes, obesity-related diabetes, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. About 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States develop gestational diabetes.

Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus—formerly known as insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), childhood diabetes. Type 2 diabetes mellitus—previously known as adult-onset diabetes, maturity-onset diabetes, or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes may include fatigue, thirst, weight loss, blurred vision and frequent urination. Some people have no symptoms. A blood test can show if you have diabetes. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes. Most people affected by type 1 diabetes are otherwise healthy and of a healthy weight when onset occurs. Diet and exercise cannot reverse or prevent type 1 diabetes. Gestational diabetes is caused by the hormones of pregnancy or a shortage of insulin. Women with gestational diabetes may not experience any symptoms.

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by recurrent or persistent hyperglycemia. Diabetes affects more than 20 million Americans. About 54 million Americans have prediabetes. Medications have also been shown to provide similar benefit. Both diabetes drugs metformin and Precose have been shown to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with this pre-diabetes condition. A group of medicines known as ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors are sometimes used to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular complications in diabetes and can also reduce the risk or progression of kidney and eye diseases. Microscopic or nanotechnological approaches are under investigation as well, in one proposed case with implanted stores of insulin metered out by a rapid response valve sensitive to blood glucose levels. Medications to treat diabetes include insulin and glucose-lowering pills called oral hypoglycemic drugs. Insulin preparations differ in how quickly they start to work and how long they remain active. Stop smoking, which hinders blood flow to the feet.

Diabetes Treatment and Prevention Tips

1. Diabetes is usually controlled by a healthy diet and regular exercise.

2. Magnesium may play a significant role in preventing Type 2 diabetes.

3. Use of metformin, rosiglitazone and valsartan.

4. Exercise, weight control and sticking to your meal plan can help control your diabetes.

5. Glucose in the blood is produced by the liver from the foods you eat.

6. Oral medications are still insufficient, insulin medications are considered.

7. Maintaining an ideal body weight and an active lifestyle may prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.

8. Strict control of blood glucose, or blood sugar, as well as blood pressure

Juliet Cohen writes articles for home remedies and homemade recipes. Learn how to give first aid in emergency situations.

Diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. Strict control of blood glucose, or blood sugar, as well as blood pressure and cholesterol is the best defense against the serious complications of diabetes.

Learn how to protect yourself from the deadly disease(Diabetes).

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

{According to the Health Care Association,Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes, accounting for at least two out of three diabetes-related deaths. While the statistics are scary, here are some important steps you can take to help prevent this deadly disease.|This kit contains material useful during and after your
diabetes — Tips, Suggestions, and other information
will help you at the time of your diabetes .

i) A Step-By-Step Guide : In this kit you will easily know.
many tricks, along with :

* History of Diabetes
* Diabetes Glossary
* What is Pre-Diabetes and Who is at Risk?
* The Cause of Diabetes
* The Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes
* The Treatment of Diabetes
* Diabetes and Your Emotions
* Possible Diabetes Complications
* How Diabetes is Managed?
* Diabetes Facts
* Diabetes Food and Meal Planning
* Diabetes Nutrition
* Insulin Resistance
* Insulin Pumps
* Lantus Insulin
* Diabetes Cure
* Diabetes Education
* and much much more . . . . . . . . . . . .}

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

Other FAQ’s

Learn More

Diabetes ampquotsilent Killerampquot

Last Updated on Wednesday, 24 June 2015 01:16 Written by admin Wednesday, 24 June 2015 01:16

People are falling victim to diabetes at an alarming rate! Diabetes mellitus is a medical disorder characterized by varying or persistent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) resulting from the defective secretion or action of the hormone insulin.

Type 1 diabetes mellitus – diabetes, for short. This chemical disorder disrupts the body’s ability to utilize certain nutrients, primarily a blood sugar called glucose.

Treatment for diabetes is made more difficult because a person can have the disease a long time before it is diagnosed. “Because the early symptoms are relatively mild,” notes Asiaweek magazine, “diabetes often goes unrecognized.” Hence, diabetes has been dubbed the silent killer.

Why Serious

Diabetes has been called “a disorder of the very engine of life,” and for good reason. When the body cannot metabolize glucose, a number of vital mechanisms can break down, sometimes with life-threatening consequences. “People don’t die directly from diabetes,” says Dr. Harvey Katzeff, “they die from complications. We do a good job of preventing complications, but a poor job of treating [them] once they occur.”

Diet and Exercise

Although Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, scientists are studying the genetic risk factors and are trying to find ways to suppress an immune attack. “With type 2, the picture is much brighter,” says the book Diabetes – Caring for Your Emotions as Well as Your Health. “Many of those who might be genetically susceptible avoid showing any sign of this disease simply by eating a balanced diet and exercising regularly, thereby staying physically fit and keeping their weight within normal limits.”

Underscoring the value of exercise, the Journal of the American Medical Association reported on a large study involving women. The study found that “a single bout of physical activity increases insulin-mediated glucose uptake [by the body's cells] for more than 24 hours.” Hence, the report concludes that “both walking and vigorous activity are associated with substantial reductions in risk of type 2 diabetes in women.” The researchers recommend at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity on most if not all days of the week. This can include something as simple as walking, which, says the American Diabetes Association Complete Guide to Diabetes, “is probably the best, safest, and least expensive form of exercise.”

However, exercise by people with diabetes should be professionally supervised. One reason is that diabetes can damage the vascular system and nerves, thus affecting blood circulation and feeling. Hence, a simple scratch on the foot may go unnoticed, get infected, and turn into an ulcer – a serious condition that may lead to amputation if not treated immediately.

Insulin Therapy

Many with diabetes must supplement their diet and exercise program with daily testing of glucose levels along with multiple insulin injections. As a result of improved health through diet and a good routine of exercise, some with Type 2 diabetes have been able, at least for a time, to discontinue insulin therapy. Karen, who has Type 1 diabetes, found that exercise increases the efficiency of the insulin she injects. As a result, she has been able to cut her daily insulin requirements by 20 percent.

If insulin is needed, however, there is no reason for the sufferer to feel discouraged. “Going on insulin does not imply failure on your part,” says Mary Ann, a registered nurse who cares for a number of diabetes patients. “Whatever form of diabetes you have, if you carefully control your blood sugar, you will minimize other health problems later.” In fact, a recent study revealed that people with Type 1 who kept strict control of their blood-sugar levels “had drastic reductions in the occurrence of diabetic eye, kidney, and nerve diseases.” The risk of eye disease (retinopathy), for instance, was cut by 76 percent! Those with Type 2 who keep tight control of their blood-sugar levels enjoy similar benefits.

To make insulin therapy easier and less traumatic, syringes and insulin pens – the most common tools used – have microfine needles that give minimal discomfort. “The first shot is usually the worst,” says Mary Ann. “After that, most patients say they hardly feel a thing.” Other methods of injection include automatic injectors that shoot a needle into the skin painlessly, jet injectors that literally fire insulin through the skin by means of a fine jet blast, and infusers that employ a catheter that stays in place for two or three days. About the size of a pocket pager, the insulin pump has gained popularity in recent years. This programmable device dispenses insulin through a catheter at a steady rate according to the body’s daily needs, making insulin administration more precise and convenient.

Keep Learning

All told, there is no blanket therapy for diabetes. When considering treatment, each individual must take into account a number of factors in order to make a personal decision. “Even though you may be under the care of a medical team,” says Mary Ann, “you are in the driver’s seat.” In fact, the journal Diabetes Care states: “Medical treatment of diabetes without systematic self-management education can be regarded as substandard and unethical care.”

The more those with diabetes learn about their disease, the better equipped they will be to manage their health and increase their prospects of living a longer, healthier life.

The Role of Glucose

Glucose fuels the body’s trillions of cells. To enter the cells, however, it needs a “key” – insulin, a chemical released by the pancreas. With Type 1 diabetes, insulin is simply not available. With Type 2, the body makes insulin but usually not enough. Moreover, the cells are reluctant to let insulin in – a condition called insulin resistance. With both forms of diabetes, the result is the same: hungry cells and dangerous levels of sugar in the blood.

In Type 1 diabetes, a person’s immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Hence, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and is sometimes called immune-mediated diabetes. Factors that can trigger an immune reaction include viruses, toxic chemicals, and certain drugs. Genetic makeup may also be implicated, for Type 1 diabetes often runs in families, and it is most common among Caucasians.

With Type 2 diabetes, the genetic factor is even stronger but with a greater occurrence among non-Caucasians. Australian Aborigines and Native Americans are among the most affected, the latter having the highest rate of Type 2 diabetes in the world. Researchers are studying the relationship between genetics and obesity, as well as the way excess fat seems to promote insulin resistance in genetically susceptible people. Unlike Type 1, Type 2 diabetes occurs mainly in those who are over 40 years of age.

About 90 percent of those with diabetes have Type 2. Previously, this was referred to as “non-insulin dependent” or “adult onset” diabetes. However, these terms are imprecise, for up to 40 percent of those with Type 2 diabetes require insulin. Furthermore, an alarming number of young people – some not even in their teens – are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes.

The Role of the Pancreas

About the size of a banana, the pancreas lies just behind the stomach. According to the book The Unofficial Guide to Living With Diabetes, “the healthy pancreas performs a continuous and exquisite balancing act, managing to sustain smooth, stable blood-sugar levels by releasing just the right amount of insulin as glucose levels wax and wane throughout the day.” Beta cells within the pancreas are the source of the hormone insulin.

When beta cells fail to produce enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, causing hyperglycemia. The opposite – low blood sugar – is called hypoglycemia. In concert with the pancreas, the liver helps manage blood-sugar levels by storing excess glucose in a form called glycogen. When commanded by the pancreas, the liver converts glycogen back into glucose for use by the body

The Role of Sugar

It is a common misconception that eating a lot of sugar causes diabetes. Medical evidence shows that getting fat – regardless of sugar intake – increases the risk among genetically susceptible individuals. Still, eating too much sugar is unhealthy, since it provides poor nutrition and contributes to obesity.

Another misconception is that people with diabetes have an abnormal craving for sugar. In reality, though, they have the same desire for sweets as most others. When it is not controlled, diabetes can lead to hunger – but not necessarily for sugar. People with diabetes can eat sweets, but they must factor their sugar intake into their overall diet plan.

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Diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be controlled. Strict control of blood glucose, or blood sugar, as well as blood pressure and cholesterol is the best defense against the serious complications of diabetes.

Learn how to protect yourself from the deadly disease(Diabetes).

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

{According to the Health Care Association,Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among people with diabetes, accounting for at least two out of three diabetes-related deaths. While the statistics are scary, here are some important steps you can take to help prevent this deadly disease.|This kit contains material useful during and after your
diabetes — Tips, Suggestions, and other information
will help you at the time of your diabetes .

i) A Step-By-Step Guide : In this kit you will easily know.
many tricks, along with :

* History of Diabetes
* Diabetes Glossary
* What is Pre-Diabetes and Who is at Risk?
* The Cause of Diabetes
* The Diagnosis and Management of Diabetes
* The Treatment of Diabetes
* Diabetes and Your Emotions
* Possible Diabetes Complications
* How Diabetes is Managed?
* Diabetes Facts
* Diabetes Food and Meal Planning
* Diabetes Nutrition
* Insulin Resistance
* Insulin Pumps
* Lantus Insulin
* Diabetes Cure
* Diabetes Education
* and much much more . . . . . . . . . . . .}

Instantly Download the Diabetes Toolkit Now!

Other FAQ’s

Learn More
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